Hindi Sexy Filmen”Sexy” clothes; netizens say, ‘itne Pyaar se Kabhi kisine daanta nahi hogan

Hindi Sexy Filmen: Neena Gupta took to Instagram and posted a video slamming trolls for judging women wearing “Sexy” clothes. The veteran actress wore a stunning dress with a plunging neckline and said, “I want to post this video because the one wears such sexy clothes, like the one I am wearing right now, people think that they don’t have any talent. Let me tell you, I have done a course in Sanskrit and a lot of other things. So don’t judge anyone based on their clothing. For those who troll, stop doing it.”

She captioned the post, “Sach Kahun Toh! #sachkahuntoh #neenagupta”

Mumbai Matinee Hindi Movie – Vijay Raaz – Rahul Bose – Sourabh Shukla – Comedy Hind Movie:Hindi Sexy Filmen

Soon, netizens hailed Neena in the comment section. One of the users commented, “Itne pyaar se kabhi kisine trolls ko daanta nahi hoga. U are too sweet 😘.”

A few days back, Samantha Ruth Prabhu took to Instagram to slam everyone who trolled her for her the ravishing gown she wore at an event.

Meanwhile, Neena will next feature in ‘Gwalior’ with Amitabh Bachchan and Rashmika Mandanna. She will also star in ‘Uunchai’.

Iconic Hindi film ‘Amar Prem’ turns 50:Hindi Sexy Filmen

Amar Prem’s Anand hated tears but he ensured that the audience went home weeping buckets

‘Who can make flowers bloom in a garden that’s destroyed by spring?’ This reflective line written by Anand Bakshi for a song in Shakti Samanta’s Amar Prem (1972) truly makes the song and the film immortal. It has been 50 years since Anand Bakshi and R.D. Burman stoked a spark that continues to light a million hearts. Young women still wait for the elusive Shyam as a dreamy night uncoils. We still quote ‘Kuchh toh log kahenge’ every time we do something unconventional, and we hum ‘Ye kya hua’ when life springs its surprises on us.

Coming of age

Based on a Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay story ‘Heeng Kochuri’ and adapted from Arabinda Mukherjee’s Bengali film Nishi Padma (1970), the innocence that marks the Bangla version remains intact in the Hindi film, as Shakti Samanta asked Arabinda to write the screenplay for it.

We see a forbidden space from the eyes of a child. For me, the abiding image of the film is when Nandu, in search of his football, crouches on his knees and peeks from beneath a curtain into a room where a courtesan is honing her dance moves for the evening. Later, he asks Pushpa, the golded-hearted courtesan, what kind of people come to meet her: “Are they your brothers?”

The bond between Pushpa and Nandu finds expression in ‘Bada natkhat hai re Krishna kanhaiyya’, composed in raag Khamaj, a song that made a mark only after Pancham’s father S.D. Burman asked him to redo the tune to reflect the prostitute’s sorrow that she cannot be a mother. And Lata too sang it with intense emotionality.

This chaste approach to the prostitute’s character permeates the love story as well, the pyara rishta (beautiful relationship), as Anand describes the platonic bond between him and Pushpa. It reflects in Sharmila Tagore’s eyes, which unleash a seductive storm in ‘Chingari Koi Bhadke,’ and in Rajesh Khanna’s gaze that is always playful, sometimes rakish.

In ‘Chingari’, the lighting and the silhouette of Howrah Bridge in the background cast an enchanting spell; few people know that the song was shot inside Mumbai’s Natraj Studios like the rest of the film.

Anand is slotted into a side act, but Khanna knows how to leave a lasting impression. A man who is emotionally scarred but hates tears, he expresses the duality with charming precision in a role that was played by Uttam Kumar in the Bangla version.

Khanna’s gentle nod and magical blink were enough to arouse the masses. He used his style memorably in scenes like the one where he shows Madan Puri, the pimp who sold Pushpa into the flesh trade, out of her room. After Dilip Kumar’s turn in Devdas, this is another memorable role of a gentleman alcoholic.

Problematic as cinema

However, the cinematic layering around the Nandu-Pushpa story remains problematic. The way Pushpa is in the film as the epitome of womanhood irks, but that was how Hindi cinema dealt with the so-called ‘fallen women’ in that era.

We have seen variants of Pushpa in PyaasaDevdas, and, of course, Pakeezah, which were released in the same year. B.R. Ishara’s very different Chetna (1970) was just a minor blip in the mainstream universe that wanted its heroine to be the mythical Sita, sacrificing herself and her happiness to meet social norms.

In Amar Prem, there is a line in the song ‘Kuchh toh log kahenge’ that goes “Sita bhi yahan badnam hui (even Sita was disgraced by this world)”. Later in the story, an artist is shown collecting soil from outside the brothel to create an idol of Durga, a long-time tradition in Bengal. In another scene, Pushpa and women like her are compared to the Ganga, which cleanses all garbage that flows into it.

Rose-tinted glasses

Interestingly, powerful real-life characters like Gangubai, on whom Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s new film is based, were challenging the status quo even then, but cinema opted instead to romanticise sex work.

This attitude comes through in each of the films in Samanta’s trilogy of AradhanaKati Patang, and Amar Prem. Even though Pushpa walks out of an abusive marriage, when her offensive husband dies, she breaks her bangles to denote grief and widowhood. Though Anand is in a dysfunctional marriage, Pushpa doesn’t think of a lasting relationship with him because she is completely aware that she is a social outcast. Curiously, Anand accepts this logic and moves out. When he returns at the end, it is to hand her over to her foster son.

A Pushpa who tries to kill herself at first because she sees no other option is seen taking on a dishwasher’s job towards the end. The screenwriter saddles the protagonist with every possible tragedy so that he can squeeze dry the audience’s tear ducts. Anand might have hated tears but he doesn’t seem to have minded making the viewers cry!

 

 

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